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Wednesday, 01 October 2014 17:21
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Forbes:

Kristin Groos Richmond and Kirsten Saenz Tobey both had plenty of experience in business and nonprofits prior to founding Revolution Foods in 2005. The for-profit organization drew not only from the business school classmates’ entrepreneur know-how, but also Richmond’s Vice Presidency at the education non-profit RISE and Tobey’s work evaluating school feeding programs in Ghana. Revolution Foods aims to get kids healthy by offering schools and individuals the chance to purchase nutritious meals and health education.Today, Revolution Foods Inc. has dished up over 33 million healthy meals – and made $50 million in revenue, reaching number 2 on the list of fastest growing inner city businesses.

Wednesday, 01 October 2014 17:21
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Photo by limonada

A new business in Japan let’s divorcing couples celebrate their change in a ceremony not unlike a wedding, except instead of publicly tying the knot, they cut it.

After one of his friends was going through a painful divorce process, Hiroki Terai had come up with the idea of holding divorce ceremonies to help couples rejoice over their decisions to part ways.

Divorce ceremonies are thus a very recent phenomenon and to witness how they take place, one will have to travel to Japan and South Korea, which are currently the only two countries where couples formally untie their marital knots. They are no different from wedding functions, but with a different outcome.

Photo by limonada.

Wednesday, 01 October 2014 17:21
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Startup advertising firm Adzookie has latched on to a high-profile way to publicize itself: by turning homes into massive billboards.

We’re looking for houses to paint. In fact, paint is an understatement. We’re looking for homes to turn into billboards. In exchange, we’ll pay your mortgage every month for as long as your house remains painted

Here are a few things we’re looking for. You must own your home. It cannot be rented or leased. We’ll paint the entire outside of the house, minus the roof, the windows and any awnings. Painting will take approximately 3 – 5 days. Your house must remain painted for at least three months and may be extended up to a year. If, for any reason, you decide to cancel after three months or if we cancel the agreement with you, we’ll repaint your house back to the original colors.

If you’re prepared for the bright colors and stares from neighbors just complete the submission form below. We review every submission. If your home meets our criteria, an Adzookie team member will contact you.

Wednesday, 01 October 2014 17:21
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DaizyMower.com has recently launched an opportunity for individuals interested in making an extra income by becoming a dealer of their robotic lawnmowers.

According to Mark Timms at DaizyMower, they have  streamlined their business model to allow anyone interested in selling their mowers to make $200 profit per sale starting October 15th.

To become a dealer, an individual simply purchases a mower for demo purposes for $479. Once a dealer finds a customer they simply enter their customers credit card info into our dealer login page and we ship the mower to the customers address and a check for $200 to the dealer.

A dealer gets sole rights to use our commercial in their local network along with poster templates and a marketing dvd on the best strategies to demonstrate and sale the mowers locally.

Wednesday, 01 October 2014 17:21
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According to a story in The Boston Globe, it’s when Chad Barraford opens his front door and swipes a radio frequency identification tag through a scanner linked to his home computer that extraordinary things happen.

Welcome home, Chad,’’ says a voice coming from a wall speaker. “You’ve been away for 1 hour and 15 minutes.’’

Time and temperature are announced. Bedroom lights blink on. Barraford’s dog, Miles, is greeted, too. By name.

Seconds later, the desk light glows. Barraford, thinking he might watch a movie later, wants to know which Netflix selections he has. “Four, sir,’’ replies Jarvis, reading off each title.

Clearly, Jarvis is one handy fellow to have around. Not just a figment but a product of Barraford’s rich imagination, Jarvis is a nexus of online resources, customized and accessed to fit Barraford’s personal needs.

A “digital life assistant,’’ or DLA, as Barraford calls his creation, programmed to give updates on everything from FedEx shipments to Facebook postings, CNN breaking news to the groceries in the pantry.

Compared with much of what’s marketed as “smart home’’ technology, Jarvis is both a marvel and a bargain. He runs on a 4-year-old Mac Mini computer with built-in speech recognition — and virtually no additional bells and whistles.

Barraford has calculated, down to the penny, how much he has spent on a DLA that does everything but brush his teeth. To date, the figure stands at $691.98.

Photo by The Boston Globe.

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