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Thursday, 21 August 2014 16:58
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Inventing is a wonderful pastime, unless your invention also ends your life. Business Insider has pulled together a list of ten inventors and their inventions that killed them. Here are five of those stories.

Winstanley – 1703 – Eddystone Lighthouse

During the Great Storm of 1703, he and five others perished when they refused to leave the lighthouse, guiding ships from the rocks, and the tower collapsed.

Horace Hunley – 1863 – Hand-powered Combat Submarine

The sub had already sunk once before when Hunley joined a routine training exercise, during which the ship and its 8 crew members failed to resurface.

The boat was posthumously named for him when it was recovered.

William Nelson – 1903 – Moped

Nelson, a 24-year-old General Electric employee from Schenectady, New York, attempted to create a new motorized bicycle prototype in 1903.

On his first test run, he fell off the bike going up a hill and was killed instantly.

Henry Smolinksi – 1973 – Mizar

The Mizar, designed to connect the highway to the sky, was unveiled in 1973 by Smolinski’s Advanced Vehicle Engineers company.

It had the body of a Ford Pinto with the wings of the Cessna, utilizing the car engine and a propeller to take off.

Poor design and construction was blamed for the events of September 11th, 1973, when the right wing of the vehicle detached from the body of the car. Smolinksi and pilot Harold Blake were killed in the crash.

Jimi Heselden – 2010 – Segway

Though not the inventor of the Segway, Heselden, the company’s owner, took a rugged terrain version of the scooter out for a ride one September morning. After backing up to allow a dog walker to pass on a narrow walkway, Heselden tumbled over an 80-foot cliff.

Thursday, 21 August 2014 16:58
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Packaging of the World:

Designed to overcome the overly loss of space between the cylinders of beer, Heineken Cube optimizes storage all along the chain: from manufacturer to consumer.

It generates a significant fuel economy during transport.

Its minimalist form gives it a strong visual identity and integrates symbolic object as in consumer memory.

A new way of drinking, economic and ecological …

Thursday, 21 August 2014 16:58
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BoingBoing:

Meet SparkTruck, an “educational build-mobile” for the twenty-first century.

Dreamed up by a group of Stanford d.school students and funded through Kickstarter, SparkTruck is a mobile maker space currently traveling across the United States. At schools and summer camps and libraries around the country, the SparkTruck team offers workshops to help kids “find their inner maker” as they design and build projects like stamps, stop-motion animation clips, and “vibrobots.”

Thursday, 21 August 2014 16:58
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SFGate:

The RoboShower™ is rectangular in design with over 20″ double-wide adaptable and one-of-a-kind head. This is to ensure that practically anyone will be able to receive adequate coverage of water flow while showering. Inventor, Mr. Audie Norr, did however keep a host of body types and sizes in mind with the design, and equipped the RoboShower™ with the ability to go from rectangular to a triangle shape to allow users to be able to manipulate the RoboShower™ to best fit their coverage needs.

The RoboShower™ also comes packaged with a shower Extension Arm and plumbers Thread Seal tape for security and mounting. The colors of choice for the RoboShower™ are silver and blue.

RoboShower™ inventor, Mr. Audie Norr, had two primary goals in mind when designing the RoboShower™. He wanted to provide the general public a shower system that gives options for waterfall coverage with the ever growing differentiation of body sizes of consumers today, as well as provide a shower system that was eco-conscious by saving on overall water usage.

Thursday, 21 August 2014 16:58
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Women’s eNews:

Jan became interested in namdas during a research project on declining crafts while getting her master’s degree at the Craft Development Institute in Srinagar, Kashmir’s summer capital.

As part of her research, Jan was required to introduce innovations to increase the marketability of Kashmiri namdas. So instead of using local wool, she used 100-percent merino, a type of sheep prized for its wool quality. She also used dyes free of azo compounds, a chemical used in dyes for its vivid colors, so they wouldn’t be harmful or bleed.

“You can hand wash our namdas,” she says. “They won’t lose their color. You can even vacuum them, things you can’t do with the ordinary namda you find in the market these days.”

For embroidery, she opted for a superior thread and a style called crewel, often used on curtains.

Photo by Neil

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